CyberKnife Lung Cancer Study | Phoenix CyberKnife Radiation & Oncology Center

LUNG CANCER STUDY

EFFECTIVENESS OF CYBERKNIFE SBRT/SABR TREATMENTS FOR STAGE I/II NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

The results of use of CyberKnife SBRT/SABR treatments for Stage I/II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, shown below, have compared favorably to surgery, both with regard to cure and complications.

STAGE I/II NSCLC RESULTS WITH HIGH DOSE SBRT/SABR

STUDY #PTS DOSE Fx SURV. F/U. COMPLICATIONS
Xia1 43 50 10 77% 3yrs 2%
Hof2 42 19-30 1 37% 3yrs 2%
Fakiris3 70 60-66 3 43% 3yrs 14%
Takeda4 63 50 5 76% 3yrs 5%
Ricardi5 196 48-60 3-8 68% 3yrs nr
Grills6 505 54 3 60% 2yrs 10%
Guckenberger7 582 54 3 47% 2yrs 7%
Shibamoto8 180 44-52 4 52% 5yrs 13-21%
Onishi9 87 45-72 3-10 67% 5yrs 1%
Timmerman10 59 54 3 56% 3yrs 16%
Stephans11 94 50-60 3-5 80% 1.5yrs 2%
Van der Voort12 70 45-60 3 62% 2yrs 13%
Uematsu13 50 50-60 5-10 66% 3yrs 0%
Zimmerman14 68 24-40 3-5 53% 3yrs 4%
Taremi15 108 50-60 3-10 77% 4yrs 0%
Baumann16 138 30-48 2-4 26% 5yrs 10%
Davis17 723 10-80 1-5 50% 2.5yrs nr
Koshy18 498 45-60 3-4 50% 3yrs nr
Rosen19 79 48-60 4-5 58% 3yrs 0%
Jeppesen20 100 45-66 3 50% 3yrs nr
Chang21 130 50 4 50% 5yrs 2.3%
Senthi22 676 54-60 3-8 57% 5yrs nr
Lagerwaard23 382 60 3-8 50% 3.5yrs nr
Hiraoka24 241 48 4 44% 5yrs nr
Chang@25 58 50 5 95%(SBRT) 3yrs 10%
79%(Surgery) 3yrs 48%
p<0.05 p <0.05

*Cause specific survival

@Randomized Trial

Most of the work outlined above has been pioneered in Europe and Japan. The last study in the table above by Chang et al, (Lancet, 2015) is the first randomized trial to compare SBRT/SABR to the historical standard of surgery. The randomized trial is the gold standard in medicine to judge results with different treatments. Dr. John Kresl, the Medical Director of the Phoenix CyberKnife Center and leading pioneer in the field of SBRT/SABR, is a co-author on the landmark randomized trial paper discussed above. The Phoenix CyberKnife Center has been offering the state-of-the-art CyberKnife SBRT/SABR treatments to its patients for XX years.

In the studies, SBRT/SABR proved superior to surgery in regard to survival. Complications also were markedly less. In the SBRT/SABR group, 10 percent of patients had grade 3 complications, which included chest wall pain, cough, shortness of breath, fatigue, and one case, rib fracture. There were no grade 4 (death) complications. In the surgery group, 48 percent of patients experienced grade 3 or 4 complications, including 4 percent of patients who died. SBRT/SABR in contrast to surgery, is a painless non-invasive procedure, done entirely as an outpatient in five days, with each treatment taking about 30 minutes to deliver.

These results compare very favorable to modern day surgical sleeve lobectomy for clinical Stage I/II NSCLC, which are outlined in the following studies:

STAGE I/II NSCLC RESULTS WITH SURGICAL SLEEVE LOBECTOMY

AUTHOR #PTS SURVIVAL F/U MORTALITY
Park26 157 58.4% 5yrs 1.0%
Van Schil27 145 49% 5yrs 4.8%
Rea28 199 39.7% 5yrs 4.5%
De Leyn29 77 45.6% 5yrs 3.9%
Ludwig30 116 39% 5yrs 4.3%
Merritt31 196 44% 5yrs 2.0%
Tronc32 184 52% 5yrs 1.6%
Fadel33 169 52% 5yrs 2.9%
Yildizeli34 218 53% 5yrs 4.1%
Deslauriers35 184 52% 5yrs 1.6%
Martini36 511* 75% 5yrs 2.3%
*All Stage I NSCLC

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